Ethnicity and religion statistics


Ethnicity and religion statistics

These statistics have been collated from a variety of different sources, which have differing ways of categorising and describing ‘race’ and ethnicity. (For example, some sources differentiate between particular black ‘groups’ whilst others do not. Some sources may just use the term Asian, others may differentiate between different Asian groups or different religious groups.) Where we have used other organisations’ statistics, we have followed the categorisation/names used by them – which means that there may be inconsistencies in terminology within and between pages.

Ethnicity

According to the Office for National Statistics, there were approximately 64.6 million people living in the UK in mid-2014. Of these, 56.2 million (87.2 per cent) were White British.


The most recent Census in 2011 highlights that in England and Wales, 80 per cent of the population were white British. Asian (Pakistani, Indian, Bangladeshi, other) ‘groups’ made up 6.8 per cent of the population; black groups 3.4 per cent; Chinese groups 0.7 cent,Arab groups 0.4 per cent and other groups 0.6 per cent.

In London in 2011, 45 per cent (3.7 million) of 8.2 million usual residents were White British.
87 per cent of those in England and Wales were born in the UK. Of those not born in the UK, 9 per cent were born in India, 8 per cent in Poland and 6 per cent in Pakistan.
The table below shows changes in the proportion (by percentage points) of the population of England and Wales, by ethnicity, between 2001 and 2011.

Ethnicity changes, 2001 to 2011

Notes:

  1. Comparability issues exist between these ethnic groups for the 2001 and 2011 Census
  2. No comparable data exists for these ethnic groups in 2001 Census

Religion

In the 2011 Census 59.5 per cent of the population of England and Wales identified as Christian. The second largest religious group was of Muslims (2.7 million people, 4.8 per cent of the population).

Faith

For more information see:

UK National Statistics


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Mrs Carol Howard
Mrs Carol Howard
6 months ago

Why is this so out of date? This is 9 years old so of little to no use

liam
liam
6 months ago

Hi Carol, thanks for your comment. The data on this page is based on UK Census data which is taken every 10 years. The next Census is in 2021 when this page will be updated. Best wishes

Natoshi
Natoshi
5 months ago
Reply to  liam

Looking forward to it being updated so we can have some recent facts to reference the distribution of ethnicity amongst the population (although it may not have changed drastically). We need facts to help support the argument for common sense, fair and reasonable representation of everyone, everywhere, according to population distribution (not just black, gay or other minority). For example, if 80% of the population of the UK is still white, then the average number of people who are on tv, media or in advertising may also be white and there is nothing wrong with that. It’s hard to make that argument without recent population stats.

Last edited 5 months ago by Natoshi
R. Farmbrough
R. Farmbrough
3 months ago
Reply to  Natoshi

According to the graph the population was 87% white in 2011

Mirijam Lutgen
Mirijam Lutgen
21 days ago
Reply to  liam

When will this page will be updated? I have to do a Revision on this topic and it would be better if I use the new numbers of the Census 🙂

Admin
Admin
20 days ago
Reply to  Mirijam Lutgen

Hello. According to this article, the ONS will publish results from the Census next year so we won’t be able to update the page until after that. Best wishes, IRR team https://metro.co.uk/2021/03/19/when-will-the-census-2021-results-be-released-14271301/

Maria
Maria
5 months ago

Hi! Thank you for this, it is great, I just had a small recomendation, in the graph you included “Gypsy or Irish traveller” and I just wanted to say that many people of the former group consider THAT name to be a racial slur, and rather recognize themselves as Roma. Just if you wanted to check that out and avoid any possible misunderstandings! Thanks again!

Admin
Admin
4 months ago
Reply to  Maria

Hi Maria, thanks for your comment. We take your point that in many contexts, especially in European countries the word Gypsy is indeed a slur. We should point out that the graph you are referring to is not our creation, but a screenshot from a UK government census so we would not be able to edit this. Furthermore, there are many groups in what is known as the GRT community in Britain who do identify with that name. For example, there is a Gypsy Roma Traveller month celebrating GRT heritage, and a London Gypsy and Traveller group etc. We don’t claim to me experts on this and accept that it is a contested term but hope this is helpful. All the best, IRR team.

Last edited 4 months ago by Admin
Izzy Taylor
Izzy Taylor
4 months ago

Thanks for this information.

I’m not sure whether it is your table or not (I’ve read the comments below) but the one showing religious affiliation incorrectly states that the numbers relate to millions. This cannot be the case since the population of the UK at the time of the 2011 Census was around 56 million. Therefore, the numbers must relate to thousands instead.

Terry
Terry
3 months ago
Reply to  Izzy Taylor

Agreed, having 14 billion people with no religion and 33 bilion christians living in the UK is hard to justify considering adding up the figures that makes about 56,000,000,000 people in the UK, which sugests we have about 8 times the total global population living in the UK.

Snag
Snag
4 months ago

That last table says Number (million) when it should actually say Number (thousand)

Sarah
Sarah
2 months ago

Hi There. I am using this information in a paper for grad school, and I was wondering if you had a citation readily available in APA format? If not, I will just use a citation website, I just don’t have the “author” and wondered if you’d be able to provide me who I should cite as the author or a citation already made. This information was super helpful, so thatnk you for providing it!

Donovan
Donovan
1 month ago
Reply to  Sarah

Look under References, at the bottom of the page. “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Census_in_the_United_Kingdom”

Paul Stanley
Paul Stanley
4 days ago

I’m not sure I understand the graph. It seems to show that the percentages of every ethnic group between 2001 and 2011 increased (except for a slight decrease in White Irish). How is that possible? Surely we should see any percentage increase in one ethnic group balanced by a percentage decrease in one or more other ethnic groups.

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